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Thread: Rules of Qira'at in Warsh?

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    Default Rules of Qira'at in Warsh?

    As-salamu aleikum wa rahmatu Allahi wa barakatuhu

    I have question about the rules of reading the Qur'an in Warsh. For example, in Surat al-Falaq, does the word "say" get pronounced differently from how it is read in Hafs. In Wars, does it get pronounced as "kula-a'uudhu" instead of Hafs where it is pronounced: "kul a'uudhu". I recorded myself saying both, and the difference is so subtle that I wouldn't know there was a difference if I didn't record them myself!

    I hope this makes sense. Thanks.


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    Senior Member Aram's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    walaykum asalaam

    yes that is correct, you can get warsh mushafs, it is written as kula in them. There are also recitations available online, the difference is subtle but you can tell if you listen carefully
    Chaska laga hai khoon-e-tamana ka is tarha
    Us khoon mein nahatay hai hum jaan bhooj kar
    khushiyon se rooth jate hai hum jaan bhooj kar
    Gham mein khushi manatey hai hum jaan bhooj kar

    http://safrehayat.wordpress.com


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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    Quote Originally Posted by Aram View Post
    walaykum asalaam

    yes that is correct, you can get warsh mushafs, it is written as kula in them. There are also recitations available online, the difference is subtle but you can tell if you listen carefully
    As-salamu alaikum

    Thank you. I have two Mushafs in Hafs - which I primeraly use - and one in Warsh. The only reason why I even know that there is a difference is because it is written in the Mushaf. I guess this particular one is a bit too subtle for my ear.


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    Senior Member Aram's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    you can hear it in this recitation http://youtu.be/Is8lWw6quyQ if you listen carefully enough
    Chaska laga hai khoon-e-tamana ka is tarha
    Us khoon mein nahatay hai hum jaan bhooj kar
    khushiyon se rooth jate hai hum jaan bhooj kar
    Gham mein khushi manatey hai hum jaan bhooj kar

    http://safrehayat.wordpress.com


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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    Quote Originally Posted by Younes View Post
    As-salamu alaikum

    Thank you. I have two Mushafs in Hafs - which I primeraly use - and one in Warsh. The only reason why I even know that there is a difference is because it is written in the Mushaf. I guess this particular one is a bit too subtle for my ear.
    Wa Alaikum Assalam Wa Rahmatullah,

    Yes, you are correct, but the difference is not subtle. Its the difference between a sukun and haraka which is quite prominent in terms of Tajweed.

    In the narration of Imam Warsh from Imam Nafi' this is know as naql wal-hadhf. Pertaining to some details, when a silent letter is followed by a real hamza in two different words. The silent letter is given the diacritic of the Hamza and the hamza is dropped.

    So it is read Qu- La - 'uu - Dhu.

    If I may ask, why did you ask the question, are you learning Warsh?


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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    As-salamu aleikum

    I have some other questions, too.

    1) In Warsh, for example, in "al-ladhiina aamanuu" is the beggining of the word "aamanuu" pronounced with a slightly longer alif than in Hafs? I hope this question makes sense.

    2) The Qul in Surat al-Ikhlaas is the same in both Warsh and Hafs, but in al-Falaq and an-Nas it is different. In Warsh, does it become Qula when it is preceeded by an "a" like in "qula-a'udhu" or "qula-ainnakum" (from Surat Fussilat, verse 9)? Or alternatively Quli when it is preceeded by an "i" like "Kuli-innamaa ana bashurun" (Fussilat, verse 6 or "quli-in kaanat lakudumu ad-daar" (2:94)? Or alternatively Qulu when it is preceede by an "u" like in "qulu-uuhiya illya" like in the first verse of Surat al-Jinn? Is this the grammar rule? I hope this question also makes sense.

    3) This question of the same type as question number 2. For example, in verse 2:6 according to Warsh it says "alayhimuu" with a long "uu" and "aandharthumuu" again with a long "uu". Is this because the letter "mim" is followed by a "a"? Another example is verse 2:77 where it says "wa minhumuuu ummiyuuna". Is this because the "mim" is followed by a "u"? I couldn't find an example for "mim" followed by an "i". Is this the grammar rule? I hope this isn't written in a too confusing manner.

    I am asking these questions, although the answer is most likely very evident to those who are knowledgable, to confirm whether I am correct or not. I have not received a formal education in Arabic, all I was taught is to read vowelized Arabic between the ages of six and nine; so that's why I am asking.

    I took all those examples at random.

    If I am correct in my assumption that those variances are governed by solid grammar rules, then I can definately appreciate the revelation of the Qur'an in seven Ahruf. Personally, I have been reading the Qur'an in Hafs so it would be quite hard indeed to switch to the grammar rules found in Warsh. It would take a lot of conscious effort.

    4) I listened to the fist six verses of Surat al-Baqarah according to Qaloon in this link: http://english.islamway.com/sindex.p..._a=view&id=184

    I noticed that according to Qaloon "yu'minuun" is pronounced just like in Hafs instead of "yuuminuun" like in Warsh. Plus "alayhim" is pronounced in Qaloon just like it is pronounced in Hafs, instead of "alayhimuu" like it is pronounced in Warsh. Why is this when both report from Nafi?

    Jazakamu Allah khairan
    Last edited by Younes; 12-05-2011 at 03:38 PM.


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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    Quote Originally Posted by AbdullahbinAbdullah View Post
    Wa Alaikum Assalam Wa Rahmatullah,

    Yes, you are correct, but the difference is not subtle. Its the difference between a sukun and haraka which is quite prominent in terms of Tajweed.

    In the narration of Imam Warsh from Imam Nafi' this is know as naql wal-hadhf. Pertaining to some details, when a silent letter is followed by a real hamza in two different words. The silent letter is given the diacritic of the Hamza and the hamza is dropped.

    So it is read Qu- La - 'uu - Dhu.

    If I may ask, why did you ask the question, are you learning Warsh?
    As-salamu aleikum

    Given the fact that I didn't understand your post, it is quite clear that I am not learning the Qur'an in Warsh! I haven't had a formal education in Arabic, all I know is how to read vowelized Arabic. That's why I don't understand even basic terms like sukun and haraka! Although I suspect that haraka refers to the vowel "a" and sukun probably when the letter is silent. [Edit] (I checked out and I was partially right in my guess. Haraka refers to a vowel, not just the the short "a" vowel, though. I was right about sukun though. I thought it referred to a letter without a vowel, that's what I meant by "the letter is silent", or at least meant to say.

    Thank you for your reply. The reason why I asked this question is because I have two Mushafs, one in Hafs which I primarily use and Warsh which I asked my brother to buy. I actually have to Mushafs in Warsh, one is written normally and the other is written in Maghribi script (I don't know if the real term is Maghribi but it is written in a different script altogether). I can even read the latter quite easily if I have previously read the Surah in Hafs and remember it. But as for Surahs that I haven't read and don't remember in Hafs, I can't really read that easily because I am not accustomed to it. In short, I am just asking out of general interest.
    Last edited by Younes; 12-05-2011 at 05:43 PM.


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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    As-salamu alaikum

    When I said the difference is subtle, I didn't mean that it is unimportant or that it was of minor importance. What I meant was that it is subtle in my ears, i.e. I find it hard to distinguish in audio.


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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    As-salamu alaikum

    I have another question:

    There are instances in the Qur'an in riwayat Hafs [Edit: correction in rasm al-Uthmani] where a certain word is written in two differents ways, involving the letters "Saad" and "Siin". However, they are pronounced the same way [Edit: in riwayat Hafs]. For example, in verse 2:247 the word "bastatan" is written with a "Sin" while in verse 7:69 it is written with a "Saad" although there is tiny "Siin" above it, indicating that it is pronounced with a "Siin" instead of "Saad".

    Another example is verse 2:245 where the word "yabsutu" is written with a "Saad", but there is a tiny "Siin" above it and thus gets pronounced as "Siin. On the other hand, in verse 30:48 the word "fayabsutuhu" is written just as it is pronounced. Another example is verse 42:12 where the word "yabsutu" is written just as it is pronounced with a "Siin".

    All of the above is about riwayat Hafs.

    I looked at the Qur'an according to Warsh and there is no little "siin" written there. Does this mean that in certain cases the word "bastatan" gets pronounced with a "Sad" and in others with a "Siin"?

    Jazakamu Allah khair
    Last edited by Younes; 12-05-2011 at 06:43 PM.


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    Default Re: Rules of Qira'at

    Quote Originally Posted by Younes View Post
    As-salamu aleikum

    Given the fact that I didn't understand your post, it is quite clear that I am not learning the Qur'an in Warsh! I haven't had a formal education in Arabic, all I know is how to read vowelized Arabic. That's why I don't understand even basic terms like sukun and haraka! Although I suspect that haraka refers to the vowel "a" and sukun probably when the letter is silent. [Edit] (I checked out and I was partially right in my guess. Haraka refers to a vowel, not just the the short "a" vowel, though. I was right about sukun though. I thought it referred to a letter without a vowel, that's what I meant by "the letter is silent", or at least meant to say.

    Thank you for your reply. The reason why I asked this question is because I have two Mushafs, one in Hafs which I primarily use and Warsh which I asked my brother to buy. I actually have to Mushafs in Warsh, one is written normally and the other is written in Maghribi script (I don't know if the real term is Maghribi but it is written in a different script altogether). I can even read the latter quite easily if I have previously read the Surah in Hafs and remember it. But as for Surahs that I haven't read and don't remember in Hafs, I can't really read that easily because I am not accustomed to it. In short, I am just asking out of general interest.
    No problem, may Allah Ta'ala increase you.

    Are the differences governed by "grammar"? if by grammar you mean the formal science of grammar (nahw) then, not always. Do they have rules? sometimes.

    The Aa can be elongated and is called a madd badal. Similarly, the meem of the plural when it comes before a real hamza is elongated to six counts. There are many other rules, it is a beautiful narration mashallah. I am not too familiar with Qaloon, so I cannot comment.

    However, know with certainty that this science has been discussed and documented in multitude. The recitation of the Quran is a deep science and from the generosity of Allah Ta'ala we have been allowed to read the Quran in many ways. Even the narrations of Imam Hafs has some allowed variations.


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